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Hungary Past and Present

Turul – The Hungarian “Big Bird”

Photo by Gulyás Attila
Turul – The Hungarian “Big Bird”

Bigger than the “Big Bird” puppet, this monument spreads its wings protectively, guarding the city of Tatabánya.  Although there are numerous turul monuments in Hungary, this one is the largest.

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István Arato

Snapshots: Tatabánya

Tatabánya's coat of arms
Snapshots: Tatabánya

Apart from the Turul monument, what else is there to see in Tatabánya?

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EPF

Török építészeti emlékek Magyarországon /  Turkish Architectural Remains in Hungary – by Németh István -  a book review
Török építészeti emlékek Magyarországon / Turkish Architectural Remains in Hungary – by Németh István - a book review

Although the Turkish occupation of Hungary is usually described as having lasted 150 years, it was actually closer to 200 years in duration.

At the Battle of Mohács, August 29th, 1526, most of the leading men of Hungary were killed by the Turks, and the king, Louis II (supposedly) drowned in a brook as he was fleeing the scene.  This was the beginning of the Turkish conquest, although Buda fortress was officially occupied by the Turks only in 1541.  During their stay, they pillaged and devastated the country.  

Later, when the Turks threatened Vienna in 1683, the western powers, who earlier had done nothing to answer Hungary’s pleas for help,  finally woke up to the threat, and mustered an international force in defense.  They beat back the Turks from Vienna, and three years later, were able to liberate Buda.  But the last Turkish soldier did not leave the country until 1718.  (Do the math: 1526 from 1718 equals 192 years of Turkish presence!)

During that time, the Turks provided for their own comfort by building baths, strengthening some fortresses and erecting mosques and minarets. Some of these latter were actually Christian churches they transformed to meet their religious requirements.

It is these architectural remains Németh István presents to us in his recently published work.

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EPF