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Véres napokról álmodom ...

Petőfi Sándor’s patriotic poems often expressed his dreams of military prowess.  In this one, he refers to his wife being there to succor him in case he is injured in battle, which ties in beautifully with the double statue recently erected in China in his honor.  He disappeared in the Battle of Segesvár (against the Russians whom the Austrians had called in to help defeat the Hungarian Revolution), in 1849.

We have kept the original spelling Petőfi used.

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Petőfi Sándor

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Another “Youth of March”: Irányi Dániel

Hungary’s role was very limited after the Rákoczi freedom fight was crushed in 1711, although the country had some independence within the Habsburg Monarchy.  After the Pragmatica Sanctio, ratified in 1723, the relationship between the Habsburg ruler and the Hungarians was somewhat more legalized..

The Parliaments during the Reform Era of the early 1800s brought very little changes, but the time was getting ripe for a larger change.  Characters like Deák Ferenc, Kossuth Lajos, Batthyány Lajos, Széchenyi István, Eötvös József, and others appeared on the horizon.

The young men who followed Petőfi and his call for freedom became known as “the Youth of March” (a márciusi ifjak).  As we have in the past several years, we will once again look at another one of these “youth”.

 

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Karolina Tima Szabó

Magyar Ismertető
This page from the Danbury Hungarian American Club's  March 1976 issue of  "Magyar Ismertető" features  contemporary comments about the Hungarian Revolution of 1848-49.  Among them is Abraham Lincoln's congressional resolution introduced while he was a Representative from Illinois, dated September 6, 1849,  in which he declares that "the present glorious freedom fight of the Hungarians elicits from us our greatest admiration and enthusiastic sympathy  ... and we pray earnestly for their prompt victory and final success." See the full story...

 American-Hungarian Community

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Csilla Somogyi
Csilla Somogyi: The Artist at 80 – a retrospective

An exhibit of paintings and etchings by this Hungarian-American artist opened in January at the Madison Art Cinema in Madison, CT, organized as a birthday surprise by her daughters. The theater plays first-run independent art and upscale foreign and domestic films. 

Placed along the sloping entryway and hung on the walls in the lobby, Csilla’s works range from small black-and-white etchings to large paintings of sports action. The exhibit runs until March 4th.

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EPF

March 15th Observance
The Pannonia American Hungarian Club will hold a remembrance of the Hungarian Freedom Fight of 1848-49 on March 15th at the Calvin United Church of Christ.   See the full story...

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Venice, FL Remembers Trianon

In  this 100th  anniversary year of the Treaty of Trianon, the Venice, FL Petőfi Klub és Baráti Kör (Petőfi Club and its Circle of Friends) held a retrospective observance, entitled ”Emlékezzünk Trianonra” – Let Us Remember Trianon – on February 8th.

 

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Eliz Kakas

 Magyar News Classics

Kossuth Lajos, 1802 - 1894
The original article was printed in the March 2005 issue of Magyar News See the full story...

 Arts and Culture

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A New Petőfi Statue in China

It may come as a surprise that our national poet is becoming a link between Hungary and China.  But his poetry soars above national boundaries, addressing basic longings of the human heart.  The newly erected statue is unusual in that, instead of showing Petőfi by himself, it presents him together with his beloved wife, Szendrey Júlia. 

 

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Charles Balintitt Jr.

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March, Tavaszelő

In the Roman era, the new year started on March first, until 1582, when the Gregorian calendar was started to be used. The month got its name from the Roman “Martius” or Mars, the god of war.

March is also called the “stormy” or “rugged” month; in Hungarian we call it “Böjtmás hava” or “tavaszelő”.

Many folk traditions are attached to the month of March around the globe, but let’s look some of the Hungarian folk traditions; some are in the past, some still exist in parts of the country. 

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Karolina Tima Szabó

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Simon Böske, Hargitay Mickey
The Beautiful Hungarians

Hungarians have been known – and sometimes even appreciated – for their brains: their intellect, their mental achievements.  Scores of our inventors have entered the world’s annals over decades, and even centuries.  So did champions of various sports, including the Olympic Games (see magyarnews.org, July 2019) where the Magyars traditionally excelled.  There has been, however, a remarkable quality of theirs that has been sorely overlooked: their Beauty.  Little has been mentioned in recent history about the first Miss Universe and the first Mr. Universe both having been Hungarian!  Let’s peek into the rear-view mirror to examine them closer…

 

 

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Olga Vállay Szokolay

Linzer Cookies (Linzi pogácsa)

This recipe has been taken from ”St. Emery’s Family Recipes”. Great accompaniment to a cup of coffee!

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Re-Connect Hungary Programs
The Re-Connect Hungary program is now taking applications for Birthright Trips. See the full story...

 Hungary Past and Present

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Carved gate in Csíkszentdomokos
Magyar Treasures: Székelykapuk (Transylvanian Carved Gates)

Typical of the Székely area of Transylvania, which until 1920 was part of Hungary, these individually created carved gates are true works of art.  They are used not only as entryways in house enclosures, but have become popular as memorials, and are found even at the entrance of villages (see the gate erected across the road leading to Zágon).

 

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EPF

Magyarosaurus

Trying to get into magyarnews on the Internet, it was certainly surprising – if not downright shocking! – to find an adjacent listing of Magyarosaurus dacus! Could not resist investigating it and became fascinated by the illustration: a nice, red dinosaur compared in size to a light-blue elephant that is being kicked in the butt by a black human figure…Get the picture?

 

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Olga Vállay Szokolay