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We wish  all our kind Readers a

Happy and Healthy New Year!

Minden kedves Olvasónknak Boldog Új Évet kivánunk!  

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Ballag már

The new year is sometimes depicted as a newborn baby, or at least a child, while the ending year as an old man.  This poem talks about the two of them. 

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Kányádi Sándor

Új esztendő
The new year has arrived silently, without leaving a footprint.  Only the moon and the sun indicated that the new year has arrived.  Only people wih good cheer and in festive attire awaited it, as 365 days of hope. See the full story...
Kányádi Sándor

 American-Hungarian Community

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Helen Kenderesi, a student of the Hungarian School, singing along
Hungarian School of Magyar Studies of America's Christmas party
On December 10th, the Hungarian School of Magyar Studies of America in Fairfield, CT held its annual Christmas party at Fairfield Middle School.

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Children’s Christmas Program, Fairfield, CT

On December 16th, the Pannonia American Hungarian Club presented its children’s program at the Calvin United Church of Christ in Fairfield, CT.

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viola vonfi

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Emblem of the original Hungarian Working Men's Benefit and Death Society of Terre Haute, IN, with date of founding
Terre Haute (IN) Hungarian Club is 109!

Kathy Miller is Treasurer of the Terre Haute, IN, Hungarian Club.  I had contacted her at the suggestion of dr. Tóth Gergely (see December 2018 issue of MNO), and she replied with the following, in relation to the age of the Wallingford, CT Hungarian House.  

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EPF

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Christmas Luncheon, St. Stephen of Hungary Church in Passaic, NJ

On December 23rd, St. Stephen of Hungary Church in Passaic, NJ held its annual Christmas luncheon, as reported by Emese Kerkay, who also took the photos.

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 Magyar News Classics

The Legend of the Turul
The original article was printed in the July-August 1996 issue of Magyar News. See the full story...

 Arts and Culture

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Patapoklos - Regional house with basket-arched porch and parapets. The street façade has a truncated hip.
FOLK ARCHITECTURE OF HUNGARY

Hungarian folk architecture is unique.  The author explains some of the special characteristics that distinguish it from the folk architecture of other countries.

 

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Simányi Frigyes

Different New Year's Customs

There are so many different New Year’s customs in Hungary that one has a hard time deciding which ones to mention!

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viola vonfi

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An early poster
“The Land of Smiles” in Shanghai

One of Lehár Ferenc’s best known operettas, presenting the problem of  East meeting West – through the love of a European countess and a Chinese ambassador – was performed in China for the first time this past November.

 

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Erika Papp Faber

NEW YEAR’S DAY RECIPE: PIQUANTE RAKE’S SOUP/ PIKÁNS KORHELYLEVES

To say good bye to the old year and welcome the new is a very important event, and many traditions and superstitions are attached to it.  One of them concerns what we eat on New Year Day. 

The “New Year Piglet” looks forward into the future with his snout.  In Hungary it is consumed in a form of “virsli” (frankfurter).

Cabbage symbolizes a roll of money; the round legumes, beans, lentils and peas represent plenty of money, food, health, etc…

Some foods are strictly forbidden to eat on New Year’s Day: poultry will fly away, game run away with our luck.

Here is a soup recipe that contains pork, cabbage and beans.

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Bicsérdy Béla
Bicsérdy Béla – ”Prophet” of Raw Vegans

A hundred years ago, a revenue officer-turned-health-guru drew a large following in  Transylvania and Hungary with his promotion of a raw vegan lifestyle.

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EPF

 Hungary Past and Present

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Photo by Gulyás Attila
Turul – The Hungarian “Big Bird”

Bigger than the “Big Bird” puppet, this monument spreads its wings protectively, guarding the city of Tatabánya.  Although there are numerous turul monuments in Hungary, this one is the largest.

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István Arato

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Tatabánya's coat of arms
Snapshots: Tatabánya

Apart from the Turul monument, what else is there to see in Tatabánya?

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EPF

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Török építészeti emlékek Magyarországon / Turkish Architectural Remains in Hungary – by Németh István - a book review

Although the Turkish occupation of Hungary is usually described as having lasted 150 years, it was actually closer to 200 years in duration.

At the Battle of Mohács, August 29th, 1526, most of the leading men of Hungary were killed by the Turks, and the king, Louis II (supposedly) drowned in a brook as he was fleeing the scene.  This was the beginning of the Turkish conquest, although Buda fortress was officially occupied by the Turks only in 1541.  During their stay, they pillaged and devastated the country.  

Later, when the Turks threatened Vienna in 1683, the western powers, who earlier had done nothing to answer Hungary’s pleas for help,  finally woke up to the threat, and mustered an international force in defense.  They beat back the Turks from Vienna, and three years later, were able to liberate Buda.  But the last Turkish soldier did not leave the country until 1718.  (Do the math: 1526 from 1718 equals 192 years of Turkish presence!)

During that time, the Turks provided for their own comfort by building baths, strengthening some fortresses and erecting mosques and minarets. Some of these latter were actually Christian churches they transformed to meet their religious requirements.

It is these architectural remains Németh István presents to us in his recently published work.

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EPF

 It's a Small World/Kicsi a Világ

Did you know…

... that our huszárs had been models for cavalry units in western countries?

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