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Magyar Madonna
This poem by priest-poet Mécs László, O. Praem. (1895-1978) is a beautiful way to end our Trianon remembrance.
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Mécs László, O. Praem.

The Trianon  Museum
The Trianon Museum

Located in Várpalota, Veszprém County, this unique institution preserves documents and objects related to the fateful so-called ”Treaty” of Trianon, which ended World War I for Hungary and deprived it of 71.5 percent of its territory. Housed in the Zichy Castle, its 18 permanent exhibits preserve the memory of the greatest national catastrophe that befell Hungary in its thousand-year history. Its slogan: ”No revolt!  But concede nothing!” 

Visitors from the areas cut off from Hungary by the Trianon Dictate are admitted free of charge.  Right now, however, the Museum is temporarily closed due to renovation of the Castle.

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EPF

Waves of History

Count Tisza István
Waves of History

Do you ever fantasize about reversing events or history?  “What if…?”

One of those “What-ifs” in my mind, as well as perhaps in some others’, is the hypothetical question about the start of World War I.

The Sarajevo assassination of heir presumptive to the Austro-Hungarian throne, Archduke Franz Ferdinand on June 28th, 1914, was undoubtedly the result of some unsatisfactory conditions.  But it certainly engulfed the world in fire, not just for the duration of the long and unfortunate war it triggered, but defined history for decades and even centuries, to the present day as well as for the future.

As expected, the five-member Austro-Hungarian Ministerial Council (also known as the Crown Council) voted for retaliation, specifically 4:1 for war against Serbia.  The only vote against war came from the visionary Prime Minister of Hungary, Count Tisza István.  (See magyarnews.org, February 2020), who was later assassinated at his home in 1918.

“What if…” they had listened to him and had opted for diplomatic solutions in lieu of the irrevocably belligerent choice?

 

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Olga Vállay Szokolay

American-Hungarian Community

Kosssuth’s Reception in New York, December 1851

After the Revolution of 1848-49 against Austrian oppression was crushed with the help of Russian troops, Kossuth took refuge in Turkey.  He was later invited by the US government, which sent a frigate for him.  He arrived in New York on December 6th, 1851. 

 

Here is a report about the event in the daily newspaper, The Sun.

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Magyar News Classics

Traditional Christmas Customs of Hungary
The original article was printed in the December, 1990 issue of Magyar News. See the full story...
Rev. Dr. Anthony Szilagyi

Arts and Culture

Christmas Cookies / Karácsonyi sϋtemény
Christmas Cookies / Karácsonyi sϋtemény

In my youth, when purchasing Christmas decorations for the Christmas tree was almost impossible, my Mother, as many other mothers in Hungary, had to improvise.  We decorated the tree with walnuts wrapped in silver and gold color foil, apples and homemade “szaloncukor”.  My mother also baked Christmas cookies, which we decorated and hung on the tree.  We had a special attachment to the meat grinder, through which we pressed the dough and formed into different shapes.

This time, I am enclosing my Mom’s recipe.  Be artistic to decorate, and enjoy.

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Karolina Tima Szabo

Magyar Treasures: The Vizsoly/Károlyi Bible
Magyar Treasures: The Vizsoly/Károlyi Bible

The Vizsoly Bible, also known as the Károlyi Bible, may be one with which some readers may not be familiar (neither was I, since I barely read text written in Hungarian).  However, I recently discovered its significance in Hungarian history as being the first surviving Bible written in Hungarian.  (As mentioned in our November issue, “The first entirely Hungarian translation of the Bible (1456) is attributed to the Pauline monk Bátori László (1420-1456).  It was numbered among the Corvinas of King Mátyás, but unfortunately disappeared in the turbulent Turkish times that followed”).

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Judit Vasmatics Paolini

”With God’s little Finger Over Us”
”With God’s little Finger Over Us”
Here is a suggestion for a Christmas present:  the story of our Editor and her family during World War II and its aftermath,  as recalled by her, and by her father in his diary and correspondence.
 
Check out what people have been saying about the book.  Order as early as possible for Christmas delivery.
 
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Hungary Past and Present

The Carpathians are Lost!

Ft. Regőczi István, 2011 (photo EPF)
The Carpathians are Lost!

The following is taken from Az Isten vándora, the autobiography of Ft. Regőczi István (1915-2013). His father was a soldier in the first World War, and Father Regőczi didn’t get to meet him until he was 6 years old, when his father returned from the war.

We thought this piece would be an appropriate one for Christmas, and a good ending to the articles dealing with World War I and its effects on Hungary See the full story...
Ft. Regőczi István

Snapshots:  Geszt, Home of the Tisza Family

The town's coat of arms.
Snapshots: Geszt, Home of the Tisza Family

Here is a glimpse of the home of the Tisza family, about whom we have an article elsewhere in this issue.

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Karolina Tima Szabo

It's a Small World/Kicsi a Világ

Kicsi a világ!

This ”Small World” episode is different, in that it does not relate a meeting of Hungarians in unexpected places, although the main character WAS Hungarian.  But the Board of Editors decided that it was a funny story, and that we need something less serious during these hard times. 

So with your indulgence, here is a ”Small World!” story, but an encounter that was not a pleasant one, as my brother Remy could have testified.

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EPF

Did You Know ...

Kapus Krisztián
Did You Know ...

... that Hungarian soccer fans are ecstatic?  Or that the thirst for knowledge is driving a man for his 21st and 22nd diploma?

 

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